Thursday, December 6, 2012

part-time work for stay-at-home parents

Even though I recently quit my full-time job, I haven't left teaching completely behind. This semester, I've been working a few hours a week for Cooking Thyme, a small business that offers cooking classes for children. The company's owner attends my church, and she recruited me and a couple other stay-at-home moms to teach. It's been great fun and well-suited to my new role at home. Mason's allowed to accompany me to weekly teachers meetings, and during my class, his care is covered by Cooking Thyme--he gets a weekly play date with other teachers' kids, which he enjoys and is also great for him.

Although a full-time, professional position working outside the home is not my choice right now, I'm not at all opposed to working a little, especially if some tasks can be done from home or Mason's allowed to accompany me while completing them. I may be biased, but I do believe that stay-at-home moms and dads, generally speaking, are a goldmine of untapped talent. Especially in this culture where an increasing number of people work from home, there are all sorts of jobs that could be outsourced to men and women looking for part-time work that they could complete in their home on their own schedule. And most stay-at-home parents don't need insurance and other benefits--a huge savings for any employer.

A mom herself, the owner of Cooking Thyme goes to great lengths to recruit, appeal to, and retain stay-at-home parents as employees. Of course, again I'm biased, but I appreciate the fresh and innovative way she runs her business.

I love hearing about the types of jobs and tasks that other stay-at-home parents have stumbled upon. Do you have an experience to share? What works for you and your family?

 


3 comments:

Aimee @ Smiling Mama said...

So neat! You'd also make a fabulous adjunct prof!

Susannah said...

Fun! I wish I lived nearby, I'd LOVE to do that! What a smart, creative owner...

Thrift Store Mama said...

This is actually a pet research project of mine: what do people or parents do for professional type work that isn't M-F, 9-5. It is shocking to me the places that don't allow part-time workers, or job shares, or flex-scheduling; and conversely it's equally as surprising the places that do !